Friends and Citizens of Wayne County, Georgia against the transport and dumping of coal ash into the Broadhurst Environmental Landfill.

Coal ash contains indisputably toxic constituents that can inflict grave damage to the human body and the environment.

These substances have been shown to escape from some coal ash disposal sites, contaminating the air, land, surface waters, and/or underground aquifers that feed drinking water wells.

Broadhurst landfill sits atop wetlands over the Floridan aquifer.

DO YOU WANT TO TAKE THAT CHANCE?

SIGN THE PETITION
IMPROVE REGULATION OF TOXIC COAL ASH IN GEORGIA
SIGN THE PETITION NOW

Because of the relative laxity of the EPA rules, coal ash is considered solid waste instead of hazardous waste and is subject to less stringent disposal requirements. By classifying the regulation of coal ash as non-hazardous — even though the EPA affirms its components are toxic — the EPA has armed utilities with a valuable if misleading talking point that the waste is non-hazardous.

Wayne County Georgia citizens:

tell your COUNTY COMMISSIONER to

ENFORCE THE

EXISTING LOCAL ORDINANCE

DOWNLOAD A SAMPLE LETTER TO YOUR COUNTY COMMISSIONER


COAL ASH: WHAT IS IT?

Coal Ash: What Is It?

COAL ASH IS TOXIC

Toxic and Radioactive

WHY WE CAN’T TAKE IT

Why We Can;t Take It

Jesup Coal Ash Meeting

“Thousands of Wayne Countians are just as incensed as I am. I am not about to back away from a bully that’s trying to endanger my family, my friends and our environment. My stubborn mule-farmer DNA, inspired by David’s fearless stand against Goliath, won’t allow it.” ~Dink NeSmith

READ DINK NESMITH’S WEEKLY COAL ASH EDITORIALS

The Altamaha River

The Altamaha River has been identified by the Nature Conservancy as one of “America’s Last Great Places.” It’s the third largest river flowing from the Eastern Seaboard, and it drains a quarter of the state of Georgia. It is noted for a broad floodplain, and for the amazing diversity along its length, with 120 rare or endangered species associated with this globally important basin.

No Ash At All

NAAA is a community group started in Wayne County, Georgia. Together with the Center for a Sustainable Coast, One Hundred Miles, and other environmental groups, we are working to prevent toxic contamination from coal ash at Broadhurst Landfill, which sits atop the wetlands of Wayne County in southeast Georgia, over the Floridan Aquifer. We’re seeking to recruit support from citizens and residents throughout south Georgia whose communities, environment, and quality-of-life are also jeopardized by the threat of putting toxins into landfills.

We strongly believe that we must not allow south Georgia to become a toxic disposal area for coal ash. The best way to do this is to adopt reliable science-based safeguards to keep such toxins out of our rivers, groundwater, wildlife habitat, and wetlands.

Jesup Police Sgt. Nick Ellis speaks out against coal ash at Broadhurst landfill

Join us in making a stand.

IT’S OUR RIGHT

to keep poison out of our water

and our fragile environment.


Environmental Leaders

Stand with No Ash At All


Jimmy Carter

Wendell Berry

Read former president Jimmy Carter’s handwritten letter to Bill Gates regarding Broadhurst Landfill in Wayne County, Georgia


The danger is real, Wayne County.

Think of the top-ten worst things that could happen in today’s world. Now think of any of those things happening to a landfill laden with cancer-causing, highly toxic and radioactive coal ash that is sitting in the middle of fragile wetlands and over a giant aquifer.

Despite a high water table and the porous, sandy soils situated atop the Floridan aquifer, plans exist to build a 250-acre rail yard alongside a landfill off U.S. 301 near the town of Screven in Wayne County Georgia.

As many as 100 train car loads a day of coal ash and/or municipal waste are slated to be dumped in the Broadhurst Environmental Landfill.

That means up to 10,000 tons daily of coal ash could be deposited in the landfill. That’s millions of tons of coal ash annually.

Besides being toxic from high levels of heavy metals, coal ash is also radioactive, just like nuclear waste, and nuclear waste doesn’t fade to safe levels for 10,000 years.

We appreciate Republic Service’s hard work and efforts to provide our community with a properly-run landfill for municipal waste. They employ us, our neighbors, friends, and families; we embrace them as a part of our business community and we wish them well. BUT — WE DO NOT WANT COAL ASH transported and dumped into our fragile wetlands environment. That means no railspur, and

NO COAL ASH AT ALL. EVER.

Because, in spite of best practices, there is no way to protect our water supply from the all too real threats of today’s volatile world; dumping coal ash in high-risk location landfills only elevates the risk of failures.

IT’S COMMON SENSE:

NOT IN FRAGILE WETLANDS,

NOT OVER AN AQUIFER.

Unbeknownst to the citizenry, Republic Services had already taken in as much as 800,000 tons of coal ash at the Broadhurst Landfill from Jacksonville Electric Authority (JEA) from 2006 until 2014.

There was a leak. They didn’t tell us.

We’re working hard at this grass-roots level to change the laws regarding where and how coal ash is dumped.

We know for a fact it cannot be anywhere near wetlands, rivers, or aquifers.

YES!
I want to help.
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