previous arrow
next arrow
Shadow
Slider

Read former president Jimmy Carter’s handwritten letter to Bill Gates regarding Broadhurst Landfill in Wayne County, Georgia

Ask Candidates for Governor:

Protect My Land and Water


COAL ash: what is it?

COAL ASH: WHAT IS IT?

COAL ash is toxic

COAL ASH IS TOXIC

WHY we can’t take it

WHY WE CAN’T TAKE IT


According to investigations by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and television station CBS 46 in Atlanta, communities in Georgia are being used as dumping grounds for coal ash being produced in other states. Loose regulations and relatively low dumping fees have made Georgia an attractive place to send CCRs.

Read about attempts to remedy this situation in the Georgia legislature that have failed and what YOU can do to help them succeed.


Thousands of Wayne Countians are just as incensed as I am. I am not about to back away from a bully that’s trying to endanger my family, my friends and our environment. My stubborn mule-farmer DNA, inspired by David’s fearless stand against Goliath, won’t allow it.” ~Dink NeSmith

NAAA is a community group started in Wayne County, Georgia. Together with the Center for a Sustainable Coast, One Hundred Miles, and other environmental groups, we are working to prevent toxic contamination from coal ash at Broadhurst Landfill, which sits atop the wetlands of Wayne County in southeast Georgia, over the Floridan Aquifer.

We strongly believe that we must not allow south Georgia to become a toxic disposal area for coal ash. The best way to do this is to adopt reliable science-based safeguards to keep such toxins out of our rivers, groundwater, wildlife habitat, and wetlands.

Wayne County School Board Representative Nick Ellis speaks out against coal ash at Broadhurst Landfill

ENVIRONMENTAL LEADERS STAND

WITH NO ASH AT ALL

Jimmy Carter

Wendell Berry

The danger is real, Wayne County.

Think of all of the natural disasters and accidents that happen in today’s world. Now think of any of those things happening to a landfill laden with cancer-causing, highly toxic and radioactive coal ash that is sitting in the middle of fragile wetlands and over a giant aquifer.

Despite a high water table and the porous, sandy soils situated atop the Floridan aquifer, plans exist to build a 250-acre rail yard alongside a landfill off U.S. 301 near the town of Screven in Wayne County Georgia.

If these plans are executed, as many as 100 train car loads a day of coal ash and/or municipal or industrial waste would be dumped in the Broadhurst Environmental Landfill. That means up to 10,000 tons daily of coal ash could be deposited in a landfill carved out of wetlands.

That’s millions of tons of coal ash annually. According to (cite the source) coal ash, besides being toxic from high levels of heavy metals, is also radioactive like nuclear waste, and nuclear waste doesn’t fade to safe levels for 10,000 years. name magazine

Because Broadhurst Landfill is located in such a wet, precarious site, it is dangerous to allow unrestricted dumping that may be safer in Subtitle D landfills situated in dryer, better suited locations. Although we can appreciate Republic Services’ efforts to provide our community with a properly-run landfill for municipal waste, we cannot rest easy until, living up to their stated intention to be a good neighbor, the company works with the citizens of Wayne County to better protect our fragile wetlands, our creeks and rivers, and the health of our citizens.

BUT — WE DO NOT WANT COAL ASH transported and dumped into our fragile wetlands environment

ever again.

That means no rail spur, and

NO MORE COAL ASH AT ALL.   EVER.

Because, in spite of best practices, there is no way to protect our water supply from the all too real threats of today’s volatile world; dumping coal ash in high-risk location landfills only elevates the risk of failures.

IT’S COMMON SENSE: NOT IN FRAGILE WETLANDS, NOT OVER AN AQUIFER.

Unbeknownst to the citizenry, Republic Services had already taken in as much as 800,000 tons of coal ash at the Broadhurst Landfill from Jacksonville Electric Authority (JEA) from 2006 until 2014.

There was a leak.

They didn’t tell us.

We’re working hard at this grass-roots level to change the laws regarding where and how coal ash is dumped. We know for a fact it cannot be anywhere near wetlands, rivers, or aquifers.